Toast to the Host: simple dukkah recipe

It’s holiday season. Time to visit friends, relax and celebrate.

I’m a big fan of dukkah. I always have it in the pantry. It’s a great for a grazing platter, with eggs on toast, salads or even a stir fry (I picked up that idea from my sister-in-law Brittny). It’s also very easy to make, and is a simple, but great gift.

Here’s a recipe I recently discovered.

homemade Dukkah
📸 Sophie Hansen

Simple Dukkah
Prep: 5 minutes, Cook: 10 minutes

½ cup (75 g) Hazelnuts, toasted
½ cup (80 g) almonds toasted
1 tsp sea salt
⅓ cup (50 g) sesame seeds
1 Tbsp coriander seeds
2 Tbsp cumin seeds

Place the hazelnuts in a food processor or mortar and pestle with the salt.

Combine the sesame, coriander and cumin seeds in a frying pan and toast until fragrant and the sesame seeds are golden. Add to the nut mix and blitz or bash to combine into roughish crumbs. Once cool, store in a clean jar for up to a month. In Good Company by Sophie Hansen (p99)

Have fun,

Nancy

ps. There are plenty of other spices or nuts you can use – so have fun with it.

pps. I always love to make my dukkah a little spicy with some white pepper or hot paprika.

New release 2021 SubRosa Grampians Viognier

It’s here! Our eagerly awaited new release SubRosa 2021 Grampians Viognier.

“It’s absolutely delicious, a beautiful wine to drink. Our 2021 Grampians Viognier is bright, yet rich. There’s minerality, some acidity and so much texture. And then there’s the aromas of stone fruit…so good,” says SubRosa Co-Founder Nancy Panter.

“It makes me want to throw a garden party. There is so much beauty and colour to enjoy in Spring in the Grampians (if it would only stop raining!).”

“I’d absolutely share this wine with smoked salmon and cream cheese sandwiches or BBQ prawns and chicken with a salad of pomegranate, goats cheese, toasted nuts and home grown lettuce and rocket.”

We like to serve Viognier at room temperature, much like you would a good soft cheese. In our house, Viognier is the go-to wine for roast pork, or, thanks to the versatility of this wine, is also a great pairing for heartier dishes like lamb!

Drinking beautifully now – or if you can, hold on to a couple of bottles/cases and see how it evolves over time (from five to seven years), this special, Grampians Viognier is a lovely wine to watch evolve.

We are renowned for producing some of Australia’s top Viognier (we only craft Viognier when the grapes are the highest quality). Our SubRosa 2020 Grampians Viognier 2020 (sold out) was reviewed by Huon Hooke, the master of Australian wine journalism, and rated as #2 Viognier in Australia with 95 points.

SubRosa Grampians ViognierSubRosa 2021 Grampians Viognier

We had a cool – mild summer in 2021. This long and slow slow grape ripening season produced beautiful complexity in our Viognier grapes.

Our 2021 SubRosa Viognier is crafted with 100% Grampians Viognier and was naturally fermented and matured in French oak for 12 months.

Only 200 dozen. Contains sulphites. Vegan. Limited availability – four bottles/order.

RRP: $48

Each year this release is highly anticipated and it will sell out. Secure yours today.

BUY HERE

What is budburst and why is it important?

SubRosa grape vine budburst

It’s budburst in the Grampians wine region and winemakers and viticulturists are excited.

Grape vines are deciduous. After fruiting in summer they lose their leaves during autumn and go into dormancy for winter. In early spring grape vines use the energy stored in their roots and wood to create new leaves. These leaves burst from their buds, hence the term “budburst”.

The air temperature, soil temperature and variety of the vine will all play a role in when budburst occurs.

Interestingly, Nebbiolo is one of the first grape varieties to burst and also one of the last varieties to ripen making it a risky variety to grow as it is more susceptible to weather events (like frost) and disease.

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the last varieties to burst.

SubRosa Cabernet grape vine budburst
SubRosa Cabernet grape vine at budburst

“Budburst is a little later than the last few seasons due to the wet and mild start to spring,” according to Adam Louder, SubRosa co-founder and winemaker.

Budburst in the Grampians is the beginning of another growing season and vintage. A reason to get excited. Vintage 2023 will be here before we know it!

SubRosa signs Australian Grape and Wine Diversity and Equality Charter

Diversity, inclusion and equality are important to the team at SubRosa, this is why we have signed the Australian Grape and Wine Diversity and Equality Charter.

We will continue to work to encourage equality in our workplace and in society.

We believe taking an active role in encouraging diversity and equality in the Australian wine sector will allow all participants to fulfil their potential, delivering benefits to individuals, companies and broader society.

Australian Grape and Wine

We encourage you to take an active role in diversity, inclusion and equity.

Visit here learn more about the Australian Grape and Wine Diversity and Equality Charter.

Why wine temperature matters

SubRosa Viognier ice bucket

All whites go in the fridge right? Well, not exactly.

Before you fill the bathtub with ice, or buy a second drinks fridge for your next party consider these wine temperature tips.

According to Adam, Viognier is like Chardonnay, but more exotic. Like Chardonnay, Viognier is best served at just below room temperature (11-13C). If it’s too cold, the texture, flavour, acid balance and aromas will be masked. If room temperature in your neck of the woods is more than 15C, pop your Viognier in the fridge to chill it slightly, but make sure to get it out of the fridge at least 30 minutes before you plan on serving it.

Like a good Brie or Camembert cheese, straight out of the fridge aromatic whites like Viognier are palatable, but not delicious. If you have patience and time to let it come to room temperature you’ll be rewarded with flavour and aroma.

Try it for yourself, pop a bottle of SubRosa Viognier in the fridge and pour a glass. Take a sip immediately after it comes out of the fridge and then try it again after 10-15 minutes, and again after about 30 minutes. What do you think?

2017-Settler-and-Sons_Rosé_Credit_@sophie_iam

Rosé on a sunny day? Yes please! Adam suggests serving Rosé chilled, but not straight out of the fridge. Give it at least 10-15 minutes to come closer to room temperature so you can enjoy its aroma, flavour and texture. It’s amazing the difference 10-15 minutes makes! Ideal serving temperature for Rosé is 10-12C.

Nebbiolo, like Pinot Noir, should be served at room temperature which is widely considered to be about 14-16C, while Shiraz and Cabernet thrive at a slightly warmer temperatures of 17-19C. On summer days when you are serving Shiraz, don’t let it get too hot or it will lose its complexity for which SubRosa is known.

Top wine temperature tips:

  1. Take your favourite white or Rosé out of the fridge at least 15 minutes before serving.
  2. Store your wine in a cool dark place, not on top of the fridge which is likely to be warmer than many other places in your home.
  3. Keep wine out of the sun when entertaining outside.

Top 10 things to do with kids in the Grampians wine region

Bunjil Shelter in the Grampians
Bunjil Shelter

Visiting the Grampians? Here are our top ten things to do with kids in the Grampians wine region.

We love living in the Grampians. We live here because Adam is passionate about working with Grampians grapes (especially Shiraz). It’s a spectacular part of the world and worth exploring. We never leave home without a picnic rug, scooters, a footy, snacks, jackets and our water bottles.

  1. Hike the beautiful Grampians National Park. Our favourite hikes are Venus Baths and Silverband falls. They are both easy walks – even with toddlers and grandparents. Our kids love playing on the rocks and in the water.
  2.  Eat ice cream in Halls Gap. And then walk to the playground in the centre of town.
  3. Eat, drink and play at the Halls Gap Hotel. Playground, it’s all about the playground. The Halls Gap Hotel has an indoor AND outdoor playground for the kids. They also serve great pub grub and local wines.
  4. Relax at Pomonal Estate. With views of the Grampians plenty of of outdoor seating and games for the kids to play – this is a great spot to enjoy a glass of local beer or wine with local produce.
  5. Stretch your legs or use the facilities at Alexandra Gardens in Ararat. The Gardens Cafe serves coffee, milkshakes, snacks or something more substantial. The walking track around the lake is great to scoot along, there’s a playground and plenty of wildlife to enjoy.
  6. Visit Victoria’s largest regional zoo Halls Gap Zoo.
  7. Drink in the view at Fallen Giants winery, just out of Halls Gap. Sit on the deck and enjoy the spectacular Grampians mountain range with a glass of wine and cheese platter while the kids enjoy the playground.
  8. Discover an aboriginal rock art site. The Grampians is home to more than 80% of south-eastern Australia’s aboriginal rock art. Bunjil shelter is just off the main drag near Stawell. It’s easy to access from the car park (max 5 min walk) and is one of the most significant sites in the region.
  9. Swim. There are several pools in the region. In winter we often visit the Ararat indoor pool, and in the warmer months, we love the Ararat or Halls Gap outdoor swimming pools and Lake Fyans.
  10. Stay in. Stay in the accommodation that you have booked. Enjoy the big open spaces and nature at its best. Nature is abundant. From echidna’s to emus, stumpy tail lizards and cockatoos, kangaroos and wallabies – you’ll see it all. Just make sure to visit one of the local wineries or our friend Simon at Grampians Wine Cellar in Halls Gap to stock up on local wine.
Toby enjoying the playground at the Halls Gap Hotel
Toby enjoying the playground at the Halls Gap Hotel

SubRosa stockists in the Grampians:

SubRosa rated in top 10% of Australia’s wineries

Real Review Top Wineries 2022 certificateSubRosa has been named as one of the Top Wineries of Australia in 2022 and awarded a Certificate of Excellence according to Huon Hooke and his team at the Real Review.

Rated at 226 (up from 307 in 2021) SubRosa is amongst the top 10% of Australia’s 4,156 wineries.

“We’re very proud that our small batch wines are receiving this recognition,” said Co-founder Nancy Panter. “It’s our aim to produce complex wines that can be enjoyed now or cellared for years and this rating by the Real Review shows we are on the right track.”

According to The Real Review, who review 10,000 wines each year, the Certificate of Excellence is awarded to a select group of wineries that consistently produce excellent wine. The Top Wineries of Australia list is a national benchmark.

Certificate recipients are determined by a proprietary algorithm, which takes into account the rating and recency of reviews by The Real Review team over the assessment period.

Recent reviews include our sold out SubRosa 2020 Grampians Viognier (96 points) and sold out SubRosa 2021 Pyrenees Nebbiolo Rosé.

SubRosa has been recognised in this list of impressive wineries since 2019.

Huon Hooke on our SubRosa 2020 Grampians Viognier:

There is elegance and restraint here as well as intensity and varietal authenticity, all delivered without any heaviness. There are nutty barrel ferment nuances, which are subtle while contributing to complexity. A lovely wine.

Shop our highly rated SubRosa wines here.